Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Broadcasting Modernism$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Debra Rae Cohen, Michael Coyle, and Jane Lewty

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780813033495

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813033495.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 18 September 2021

“Speech without Practical Locale”

“Speech without Practical Locale”

Radio and Lorine Niedecker’s Aurality

Chapter:
(p.221) Chapter 12 “Speech without Practical Locale”
Source:
Broadcasting Modernism
Author(s):

Broo Khouglum

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813033495.003.0013

When Lorine Niedecker invokes radio as “a good medium for poetry”, she indexes the aural components of poetic writing and reception. This chapter argues that the radio was a sustained subtending component of Niedecker's composition practices, at times providing a context for her reflections on orality and aurality in poetry and at other times offering a venue for which to write, a subject to write about, and a means to experiment with genre and method. By considering Niedecker's practices of writing script-poems and radio scripts, listening to radio, and incorporating speech in poems, one might understand more closely her attunement to precise qualities, durations, rhythms, and materials of sound that generates a poetics of aural collage, speech reportage, and voice experiment.

Keywords:   radio speech, poetic writing, orality, script-poems, aural collage

Florida Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .