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Posting ItThe Victorian Revolution in Letter Writing$
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Catherine J. Golden

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780813033792

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813033792.001.0001

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Conclusion Looking Forward from the Victorian Revolution in Letter Writing to Information Technologies Today

Conclusion Looking Forward from the Victorian Revolution in Letter Writing to Information Technologies Today

Chapter:
(p.235) Conclusion Looking Forward from the Victorian Revolution in Letter Writing to Information Technologies Today
Source:
Posting It
Author(s):

Catherine J. Golden

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813033792.003.0007

This chapter examines George Elgar Hicks's 1860 painting The General Post Office, One Minute to Six as a lens through which to explore how epistolary communication of the nineteenth century and information technologies in the later twentieth and twenty-first centuries interweave in integral ways. It cites the relevance of four clusters of details and figures in the painting — a lady holding a letter with stamps, signaling innovation; a lost child and four patrons rushing to make the last post, symbolizing bewilderment and anxiety; a pickpocket, an image of criminality; and a policeman, standing for law and order — to illuminate what the current information revolution has inherited from the Victorian revolution in letter writing.

Keywords:   information technologies, George Elgar Hicks, letter writing, Post Office

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