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Bernard Shaw as Artist-Fabian$
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Charles A. Carpenter

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780813034058

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813034058.001.0001

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The Roots of Shaw’s Distinctive Fabianism

The Roots of Shaw’s Distinctive Fabianism

Chapter:
(p.10) 2 The Roots of Shaw’s Distinctive Fabianism
Source:
Bernard Shaw as Artist-Fabian
Author(s):

Charles A. Carpenter

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813034058.003.0002

Among other Fabian socialists, Bernard Shaw was recognized as one who was unconventional. He saw Graham Wallas, Sydney Olivier, and Sidney Webb as comprising the Three Musketeers of Fabianism, and thought of himself to have acquired D'Artagnan's role. In spite of how many Fabian colleagues and historians would perceive Shaw to have valuable contributions, Shaw's behavior was often associated with serious problems and may have even been viewed as a hindrance to advancing Fabian goals. To add to his insufficient educational credentials, Shaw was often characterized as veering away from standard rhetoric in pursuing different lines of thought. This chapter attempts to illustrate how Shaw initiated his distinct brand of Fabianism and how he expressed support towards the permeation strategy.

Keywords:   Graham Wallas, Sydney Olivier, Sidney Webb, permeation strategy, Fabianism, Fabian goals

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