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Beneath the Ivory TowerThe Archaeology of Academia$
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Russell K. Skowronek and Kenneth E. Lewis

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780813034225

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813034225.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 18 September 2021

Campus Archaeology/Public Archaeology at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Campus Archaeology/Public Archaeology at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Chapter:
(p.98) (p.99) 6 Campus Archaeology/Public Archaeology at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts
Source:
Beneath the Ivory Tower
Author(s):

JOHN D. STUBBS

PATRICIA CAPONE

CHRISTINA J. HODGE

DIANA D. LOREN

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813034225.003.0006

Current campus archaeology at Harvard University focuses on the seventeenth century (which includes the underrepresented story of Native American education at Harvard) as a platform for reflecting on the shape and aims of today's educational community as well as relationships to Native American neighbors and indigenous communities around the world. Toward this end, three university entities have come together in exploration and dialogue through a course: The Archaeology of Harvard Yard. In this course, the Department of Anthropology, Harvard University Native American Program (HUNAP), and the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology aim to train students in historical public archaeology as a means to explore educational history, colonial America, and our collective future. The course emphasizes public archaeology and the relationship of study to stakeholders. Students not only explore the guiding frameworks of historical public archaeology but also are given an opportunity to engage archaeologists in dialogue through public events and creating public information.

Keywords:   archaeology, Harvard University, Native Americans, Harvard Yard, Native American Program, Peabody Museum, public archaeology

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