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AIDS, Culture, and Gay Men$
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Douglas A. Feldman

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780813034317

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813034317.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 15 October 2019

Gay Men, Syphilis, and HIV

Gay Men, Syphilis, and HIV

The Biological Impact of Social Stress

Chapter:
(p.21) 2 Gay Men, Syphilis, and HIV
Source:
AIDS, Culture, and Gay Men
Author(s):

Frederick R. Bloom

Jami S. Leichliter

David K. Whittier

Janet W. Mcgrath

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813034317.003.0002

Responses to sexually transmitted diseases have included considerable efforts by governments, communities, individuals, health care advocates, and public health systems. In the past twenty years, this included the notable example of HIV prevention, but it also includes prevention of herpes simplex virus—type 2 (HSV2), syphilis, gonorrhea, chlamydia, and others. Following the initial onslaught of HIV among gay men in the United States, gay men, as individuals or members of communities, have taken steps to reduce sexual risk by changing their behaviors and often expecting those changes to be adopted by others. This resulted in a normative change that set a moral imperative extolling those who were “safer,” while exerting social control on others who were not. This chapter examines how social stress within the American gay community has elevated both syphilis and HIV rates. Some of the social responses have been flight, isolation, blame (or scapegoating), and ostracism. Drug use often puts some gay men at increased risk for HIV infection and syphilis. The chapter looks at responses that decrease the biological impact of social stress.

Keywords:   HIV infection, syphilis, gay men, social stress, biological impact, public health systems, isolation, HIV prevention, ostracism, drug use

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