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Making Caribbean DanceContinuity and Creativity in Island Cultures$
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Susanna Sloat

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780813034676

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813034676.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 17 October 2019

How to Dance Son and the Style of a Dominican Sonero

How to Dance Son and the Style of a Dominican Sonero

Chapter:
(p.198) 13 How to Dance Son and the Style of a Dominican Sonero
Source:
Making Caribbean Dance
Author(s):
Xiomarita Pérez, Maria Lara Soto
Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813034676.003.0013

Xiomarita Pérez discusses the Dominican son, its dance, how to teach it, and the characteristics of dance and personal style that mark a true Dominican sonero. The Dominican son descends from the Cuban son, but the dance and music have developed locally. To the son's irresistible rhythms and lilting guitar, the soneros, urban people who have developed a subculture that stresses elegance, dance with grace and great style, hips moving to the lilt, men taking breaks for elaborate footwork or inventive body shifts, women and men partnering as one. Pérez, who teaches son (among other dances) in Santo Domingo, emphasizes rhythm and the elegance of son and the sonero.

Keywords:   Xiomarita Pérez, Dominican son, Dominican sonero, footwork, hips moving, dance partnering, Santo Domingo, rhythm, dance style

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