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A History of the Catholic Church in the American South,
1513–1900$
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James M. Woods

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780813035321

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813035321.001.0001

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To the Manor Born

To the Manor Born

Catholics in the Southern English Colonies, 1633–1763

Chapter:
(p.106) Four To the Manor Born
Source:
A History of the Catholic Church in the American South, 1513–1900
Author(s):

James M. Woods

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813035321.003.0004

English Catholicism took on its own distinctive characteristic as an upper-class sect in which the landed gentry dominated. The manors of these lords now became the centers for the Catholic community. This predominant position of the upper class and the experience of toleration as a minority sect were two features of English Catholicism that shaped the Catholic experience in colonial America. The instigator for the Maryland colony was Sir George Calvert, the first Lord Baltimore. In 1621 he founded a colony on the Newfoundland coast he initially called Ferryland. Two years later he obtained royal patent to oversee this colony and changed its name to Avalon. It mainly contained Welsh Protestant families, yet the climate was so cold and the land so unyielding that the colony floundered. However, this failure did not quench Calvert's desire to found a colony in the United States.

Keywords:   Catholicism, manors, lords, Maryland, colony, George Calvert, Newfoundland, Ferryland, Avalon, United States

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