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Misfortunes and Shipwrecks in the Seas of the Indies, Islands, and Mainland of the Ocean Sea (1513–1548)Book Fifty of the 'General and Natural History of the Indies'$
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Gonzalo Fernandez de Oviedo

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780813035406

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813035406.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 06 July 2022

Of another shipwreck that happened later in the same year as the previous one but with not such happy outcome as was related above.

Of another shipwreck that happened later in the same year as the previous one but with not such happy outcome as was related above.

Chapter:
(p.164) Chapter XXIX Of another shipwreck that happened later in the same year as the previous one but with not such happy outcome as was related above.
Source:
Misfortunes and Shipwrecks in the Seas of the Indies, Islands, and Mainland of the Ocean Sea (1513–1548)
Author(s):

Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813035406.003.0030

Three caravels departed Puerto Rico in May 1548. The largest vessel of 130 tons burthen was the Sancti Spíritus and was the flagship of the convoy. The smallest of the three ships, whose master was Amador Gonzálvez, a resident of Puerto Rico, because it was the fastest, did not remain with the others for more than four days before it sailed on ahead. The third caravel, the San Juan, almost the same size as the flagship, remained with it, although because it too was faster, it always went on ahead, but in the evening shortened sail to wait for the flagship to catch up. On the eighth day of the Ascension, with fair wind and sea, the San Juan was about two crossbow shots ahead of the Sancti Spíritus. At nine o'clock on a clear and serene morning, sailing along pleasantly with a stern wind, disaster struck. This chapter tells the story of that disaster.

Keywords:   caravels, Puerto Rico, Sancti Spíritus, flagship, convoy, Amador Gonzálvez, San Juan, Ascension

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