Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Painting Dixie RedWhen, Where, Why, and How the South Became Republican$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Glenn Feldman

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780813036847

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813036847.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 02 July 2022

A Southern Road Less Traveled: The 1966 Gubernatorial Election and (Winthrop) Rockefeller Republicanism in Arkansas

A Southern Road Less Traveled: The 1966 Gubernatorial Election and (Winthrop) Rockefeller Republicanism in Arkansas

Chapter:
(p.172) 8 A Southern Road Less Traveled: The 1966 Gubernatorial Election and (Winthrop) Rockefeller Republicanism in Arkansas
Source:
Painting Dixie Red
Author(s):

John A. Kirk

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813036847.003.0009

This chapter argues that neither the “southern strategy” (or “white backlash” thesis) nor newer Suburban School explanations adequately account for how and why the South became Republican. By focusing on the gubernatorial career of northern Republican Winthrop Rockefeller in Arkansas, the chapter rejects the “southern strategy” of appealing to the distinctive regional politics of the South and the “suburban strategy” of a regional convergence of shared, white middle-class suburban values across the country. The Arkansas example turns established wisdom on its head because, rather than appealing to southern racial conservatism, Rockefeller opposed a strong segregationist Democrat, actively sought black votes, and offered a genuine alternative of liberal, socially progressive reform and spending as a way to move a profoundly poor southern state forward. In doing so, the chapter argues, Rockefeller took a progressive “Republican road less traveled” and effectively set the political agenda in Arkansas for at least the next three decades.

Keywords:   Winthrop Rockefeller, Arkansas, “Southern Strategy”, “Suburban Strategy”, Rockefeller Family, Progressive Reform

Florida Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .