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Algerians without BordersThe Making of a Global Frontier Society$
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Allan Christelow

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780813037554

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813037554.001.0001

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A Failed Transformation, 1775–1830

A Failed Transformation, 1775–1830

Chapter:
(p.25) 1 A Failed Transformation, 1775–1830
Source:
Algerians without Borders
Author(s):

Allan Christelow

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813037554.003.0002

This chapter begins with an Algerian triumph, the defeat of a Spanish attack in 1775, and ends with the disaster of the French conquest of Algiers in 1830. It examines efforts by Ottoman rulers to acquire new technology and build ties with Western powers, and by mixed race Kulughli scholars, such as Hamdan Khodja, to explore Western ideas. Special attention is paid to Algerian-American relations following the capture of two American vessels by the Barbary pirates in 1785. After an initial period of success from 1775 to 1785, Algeria came to face serious challenges stemming from drought and outbreaks of bubonic plague, from internal political rivalries, and from Algeria's entanglement in Anglo-French conflicts. This chapter also examines the impact of developments in the Middle East including the defeat of the Ottoman Empire by Russia in 1783, and the emergence of neo-Sufi orders that came to pose military challenges to Algeria's Ottoman rulers.

Keywords:   Ottoman, Kulughli, Algiers, Hamdan Khodja, Barbary pirates, bubonic plague, neo-Sufi

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