Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Beyond Forty Acres and a MuleAfrican American Landowning Families since Reconstruction$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Debra Reid and Evan Bennett

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780813039862

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813039862.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 26 January 2022

Land Ownership and the Color Line: African American Farmers in the Heartland, 1870s–1920s

Land Ownership and the Color Line: African American Farmers in the Heartland, 1870s–1920s

Chapter:
(p.155) 7 Land Ownership and the Color Line: African American Farmers in the Heartland, 1870s–1920s
Source:
Beyond Forty Acres and a Mule
Author(s):

Debra A. Reid

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813039862.003.0008

Debra A. Reid addresses the tensions that emerged in a border area where North met South, rural met urban, and ethnic met American. She considers the ways that urban markets and ethnic diversity created different dynamics that African Americans negotiated to try to cross the color line that kept them landless in the post-Reconstruction Midwest. Farmers near the city raised wheat, cut cordwood, and raised hogs, as did many of their neighbors. Such economic diversity kept the families busy and mobile across race boundaries. They interacted at market, worried about crop and stock prices, and helped one another as need arose. Yet black landowning farmers and their white peers remained ideologically separate and sometimes geographically separate, with black farm families confined to black settlements. This undermined the potential that a biracial class alliance might have offered prior to the Great Depression.

Keywords:   Midwest, black settlements, urban, rural, color line, wheat, hogs, market, biracial, diversity

Florida Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .