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The German Joyce$
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Robert K. Weninger

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780813041667

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813041667.001.0001

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“‘Concordances’ of Utter Chaos Post Rem”: A Portrait of James Joyce as a Chapter in German (Marxist) Literary History

“‘Concordances’ of Utter Chaos Post Rem”: A Portrait of James Joyce as a Chapter in German (Marxist) Literary History

Chapter:
(p.174) 7 “‘Concordances’ of Utter Chaos Post Rem”: A Portrait of James Joyce as a Chapter in German (Marxist) Literary History
Source:
The German Joyce
Author(s):

Robert K. Weninger

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813041667.003.0008

This chapter takes an in-depth look at the role played by Joyce’s Ulysses in the so-called German Expressionism debate that raged among German Marxists in exile in the late 1930s—most prominently among them Georg Lukács, Bertolt Brecht and Ernst Bloch—and its extension into the so-called Lukács-Adorno debate in the 1950s. The extent to which Joyce’s Ulysses was used as a model for or counter-model to socialist realism and as an argumentative prop for the theoretical debate surrounding the “proper” representation of reality from a Marxist vantage point is quite remarkable, especially if one considers the fact that Joyce’s Ulysses had already been declared the epitome of the bourgeois decadent novel by the orthodox Marxist critic Karl Radek as early as 1934 at the Moscow International Writers Congress.

Keywords:   James Joyce, James Joyce’s Ulysses, Marxism and Literature, German Expressionism Debate, Georg Lukács, Bertolt Brecht, Ernst Bloch, Karl Radek, Theodor W. Adorno

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