Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Motul de San JoséPolitics, History, and Economy in a Classic Maya Polity$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Antonia E. Foias and Kitty F. Emergy

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780813041902

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813041902.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 23 September 2021

Wealth, Status, and Stucco: Micromorphology Studies at Trinidad, a Secondary Center in the Motul de San José Periphery

Wealth, Status, and Stucco: Micromorphology Studies at Trinidad, a Secondary Center in the Motul de San José Periphery

Chapter:
(p.229) 8 Wealth, Status, and Stucco: Micromorphology Studies at Trinidad, a Secondary Center in the Motul de San José Periphery
Source:
Motul de San José
Author(s):

Ellen Spensley Moriarty

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813041902.003.0008

In 2003, plaster samples from floors, walls, and benches were collected from the subsidiary site of Trinidad de Nosotros, located southeast of Motul de San José on the northern shore of Lake Petén-Itza. Microscopic study of these structurally intact plaster samples has revealed that patterns of floor construction and plaster ingredients varied according to location around the site. In particular, the floors of buildings from groups classified as Plaza Plan 2 were carefully created in a layered pattern that is likely an expression of the high status of the residents. A comparison with plaster samples taken from nearby Tikal has revealed that plasters used within elite residences and some ritual features at Trinidad show similarities in construction and decorative finishing techniques. Plasters from the Postclassic port facility are also examined, supporting its heavy use and continuous replastering. The changes in the plastering technology over time are also described. The results of this geoarchaeological analysis of plasters demonstrate that very subtle expressions of wealth, status, and activities may be deduced through the microscopic study of intact sediments and anthropogenic materials.

Keywords:   Classic Maya, Archaeology, Stucco, Plaster technology, Social stratification

Florida Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .