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Bioarchaeology and BehaviorThe People of the Ancient Near East$
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Megan A. Perry

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780813042299

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813042299.001.0001

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Daily Activity and Lower Limb Modification at Bab edh-Dhra̓, Jordan, in the Early Bronze Age

Daily Activity and Lower Limb Modification at Bab edh-Dhra̓, Jordan, in the Early Bronze Age

Chapter:
(p.180) 8 Daily Activity and Lower Limb Modification at Bab edh-Dhra̓, Jordan, in the Early Bronze Age
Source:
Bioarchaeology and Behavior
Author(s):

Jaime M. Ullinger

Susan G. Sheridan

Donald J. Ortner

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813042299.003.0009

The cemetery of Bab edh-Dhra' spans from Early Bronze IA to IV (ca. 3150–2200 BC). There are no settlement remains dating to the EB IA (3150–3050 BC). Sometime during EBII-III (2850 BC–2300 BC), people erected a large, walled town supported by increased agriculture and secondary product use near the EBIA cemetery. Mortuary practices also shifted, and people were buried in large, above-ground charnel houses rather than shaft tombs. Both archaeological and skeletal/dental evidence indicate an increasingly sedentary lifestyle with a greater reliance on agriculture from EB IA through EB II-III. This study suggests that daily activity changes affected the ankles and feet of people at Bab edh-Dhra', but that stresses on the knee remained similar over time.

Keywords:   Jordan, Early Bronze Age, Musculoskeletal markers, Activity patterns, Urbanization

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