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Ancient Maya PotteryClassification, Analysis, and Interpretation$
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James John Aimers

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780813042367

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813042367.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 15 October 2019

Mayapán’s Chen Mul Modeled Effigy Censers

Mayapán’s Chen Mul Modeled Effigy Censers

Iconography and Archaeological Context

Chapter:
(p.203) 12 Mayapán’s Chen Mul Modeled Effigy Censers
Source:
Ancient Maya Pottery
Author(s):

Susan Milbrath

Carlos Peraza Lope

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813042367.003.0012

Susan Milbrath and Carlos Peraza discuss the famous Chen Mul Modeled full-figure effigy censers of Mayapán. Variants of these are found across the Maya area in the Late Postclassic; in an article we wrote with Lynda Folan (Milbrath et al. 2008), we argued that archaeologists should be more cautious in using the Chen Mul Modeled type name for effigy censers with significant stylistic variation from the Mayapán censers. We suggested that many people are using the Chen Mul Modeled type name like a system name, to identify broad stylistic similarity that nevertheless encompasses significant local variation that may be of use in mapping intersite and interregional interaction. Milbrath and Peraza provide the most comprehensive summary to date of the possible origins of Chen Mul and conclude that the origins of this ceramic system in all likelihood lie to the west of the Maya heartland in the Late and Terminal Classic, possibly as part of the famous Mixteca-Puebla tradition at sites like Cacaxtla and Cholula, or perhaps on the Gulf Coast. In any case, the most current data suggest that the style is first found at Mayapán near the beginning of the thirteenth century.

Keywords:   Chen Mul, effigy censer, Mayapán, ceramic, system, name, intersite, interregion, Late Classic, Terminal Classic, Mixteca-Puebla

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