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Ain't Scared of Your JailArrest, Imprisonment, and the Civil Rights Movement$
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Zoe A. Colley

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780813042411

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813042411.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 19 October 2019

You Can’t Jail the Revolution

You Can’t Jail the Revolution

Chapter:
(p.102) 6 You Can’t Jail the Revolution
Source:
Ain't Scared of Your Jail
Author(s):

Zoe A. Colley

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813042411.003.0007

Chapter 6 examines the radicalization of movement supporters during the post-1965 era and the increasing prominence of the black power movement. As activists came to emphasize racial separatism, political empowerment, and a redistribution of America's wealth, they encountered a white power structure that sought to criminalize their efforts with ever-more serious charges. Freed from the earlier emphasis of the nonviolent movement upon integration and respectability, black power activists developed a radical critique of the American criminal justice system. By pointing to the way in which the power of the criminal justice system was rooted in the political and economic powerlessness of black communities, activists formulated an argument that presented all black prisoners as victims of a racist social structure.

Keywords:   Black power, Black Panther Party, Joan Little, New Orleans, Louisiana, Birmingham, Alabama, Jackson, Mississippi

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