Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Before DaybreakAfter the Race and the Origins of Joyce's Art$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Coilin Owens

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780813042473

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813042473.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 05 July 2020

Rhetoric—Modern and Classical

Rhetoric—Modern and Classical

Chapter:
(p.178) 6 Rhetoric—Modern and Classical
Source:
Before Daybreak
Author(s):

Cóilín Owens

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813042473.003.0006

Chapter 6 offers an analysis of the rhetorical dimensions of the story. While “After the Race” is superficially a parody of popular sports and adventure journalism, its design and discursive style derive from Joyce's schooling in the elements of classical literature and rhetoric. A careful analysis of the structure, narrative style, and management of voices demonstrates how, for the beginning of his writing career, Joyce is a sophisticated rhetorician. His subtle handling of free indirect discourse, figurative language, chiasmus, anticlimax, and silence document his early experimentalism. Joyce's debt to classicism is documented by his management the mythological parallels between the plot and characterization in the story and Ovid's account of the fall of Phaethon.

Keywords:   journalism, classical rhetoric, modern rhetoric, free indirect discourse, chiasmus, anticlimax, Phaethon

Florida Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .