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Bioarchaeology of East AsiaMovement, Contact, Health$
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Kate Pechenkina and Marc Oxenham

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780813044279

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813044279.001.0001

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Bioarchaeological Perspectives on Systemic Stress during the Agricultural Transition in Prehistoric Japan

Bioarchaeological Perspectives on Systemic Stress during the Agricultural Transition in Prehistoric Japan

Chapter:
(p.344) 14 Bioarchaeological Perspectives on Systemic Stress during the Agricultural Transition in Prehistoric Japan
Source:
Bioarchaeology of East Asia
Author(s):

Daniel H. Temple

Clark Spencer Larsen

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813044279.003.0014

This chapter explores patterns of health during the agricultural transition in prehistoric Japan using skeletal indicators of stress. Middle to Final Jomon cultures (5000 through 2300 BP) represent the foraging component to this study, while Yayoi cultures (2500 through 1700 BP) represent the early agricultural sample. Oral health declined in Southern Honshu and Northern Kyushu following the transition to agriculture in association with increased consumption of carbohydrates, and possibly, malocclusion. Enamel hypoplasia declined between western Jomon and Yayoi people and remained stable between eastern Jomon and Yayoi communities. Periostitis reduced in frequency, while cribra orbitalia prevalence remained consistent in Northern Kyushu and Southern Honshu following the Jomon period. These trends suggest that the general level of systemic stress declined, while oral health suffered following the agricultural transition in prehistoric Japan.

Keywords:   Jomon, agricultural transition, oral health, skeletal lesions, cribra orbitalia

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