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Early and Middle Woodland Landscapes of the Southeast$
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Alice P. Wright and Edward R. Henry

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780813044606

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813044606.001.0001

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Social Landscapes of Early and Middle Woodland Peoples in the Southeast

Social Landscapes of Early and Middle Woodland Peoples in the Southeast

Chapter:
(p.247) 17 Social Landscapes of Early and Middle Woodland Peoples in the Southeast
Source:
Early and Middle Woodland Landscapes of the Southeast
Author(s):

David G. Anderson

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813044606.003.0017

This paper examines how each of the contributors to the volume explores the Woodland social landscape of the Southeast. The discussion examines the many different theoretical and methodological perspectives, as well as the many different kinds of archaeological evidence, that the individual chapter authors brought to bear on the topic. The papers demonstrate, each in their own way, that landscape history matters in southeastern archaeology. Domestic and ceremonial features like houses and work areas, mounds, earthworks, and plazas, as well as intervening fields, forests, and waterways, should not be thought of as finished creations but as socially constructed and cognized, continually changing settings. Southeastern prehistoric landscapes reflect the history and traditions of the peoples who lived in and shaped them. Landscape can be examined in many ways, and the archaeological case studies offered provide a means to examine how people over large areas were connected, and interacted, during the Woodland period.

Keywords:   landscape archaeology, burial mounds, ceremonial centers, Woodland period, monumentality, archaeological syntheses, southeastern archaeology, prehistoric interaction

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