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Shaw's SettingsGardens and Libraries$
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Tony Jason Stafford

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780813044989

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813044989.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 17 September 2021

Misalliance

Misalliance

Gardens and Books as the Means to New Dramatic Forms

Chapter:
(p.87) 7 Misalliance
Source:
Shaw's Settings
Author(s):

Tony Jason Stafford

R. F. Dietrich

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813044989.003.0008

In Misalliance, it would seem at first glance that Shaw has abandoned the use of both gardens and libraries, for the sole on-stage setting is “a big hall with tiled flooring” and a “glass pavilion [which] springs from a bridgelike arch in the wall of the house.” But that would be a mistake, for gardens and books are both present, but in a way unlike anything Shaw has attempted before: the garden, with which much interaction occurs by characters such as Hypatia and Percival as well as others, is outside and seen through the enormous glass pavilion, and books and libraries form a major portion of the conversations, especially discussions involving John Tarleton. Furthermore, gardens and books are united in their mutual function of enabling Shaw to move in a new direction in both the style of the play and in his use of settings.

Keywords:   Glass pavilion, Nature, Airplane, Visitors, Parent/child, Romance, Magical, Reading, Man of Ideas, Capitalism

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