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Trends and Traditions in Southeastern Zooarchaeology$
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Tanya M. Peres

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780813049274

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813049274.001.0001

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Foodways, Economic Status, and the Antebellum Upland South Cultural Tradition in Central Kentucky

Foodways, Economic Status, and the Antebellum Upland South Cultural Tradition in Central Kentucky

Chapter:
(p.50) 3 Foodways, Economic Status, and the Antebellum Upland South Cultural Tradition in Central Kentucky
Source:
Trends and Traditions in Southeastern Zooarchaeology
Author(s):

Tanya M. Peres

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813049274.003.0003

Tanya M. Peres offers chapter 3, “Foodways, Economic Status, and the Antebellum Upland South Cultural Tradition in Central Kentucky.” Regional cuisines, or foodways, have been of interest to both historians and archaeologists for at least the past 30 years. In the Antebellum Upland South scholars recognize a regional foodway that is part of the larger Upland South cultural tradition. The agricultural and archaeological data on subsistence in the Antebellum Upland South have been woven into an idealized set of subsistence practices that revolved around agricultural practices. The examination of four contemporaneous faunal assemblages representative of different societal classes living in nineteenth-century Kentucky shows that this generalized version of Upland South foodways does not hold true across economic classes. Instead, a closer look reveals that many people living on Kentucky's antebellum farmsteads struggled on a regular basis for food security, and that the idealized version of a shared Upland South foodway was restricted to the wealthy planter class that had ready access to the market economy.

Keywords:   food security, regional cuisine, Upland South, foodways

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