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Jazz DanceA History of the Roots and Branches$
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Lindsay Guarino and Wendy Oliver

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780813049298

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813049298.001.0001

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A Study of the Power of Club Jazz in 1980s London

A Study of the Power of Club Jazz in 1980s London

Chapter:
(p.261) 31 A Study of the Power of Club Jazz in 1980s London
Source:
Jazz Dance
Author(s):

Michèle Scott

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813049298.003.0031

In the 1980s, a few young DJs began playing jazz music in English clubs and at all-day dance events. Jazz music, with its complex layering of rhythm and phrasing, presented a challenge to dancers more familiar with disco and funk. The search for a dance style that fit the music resulted in a return to jazz dance. It is more specifically called either “street jazz” or “club jazz,” and was inspired by the rhythm tap and vernacular dance that the dancers saw in the musical films of the 1930s through 1950s. The author studied dancers at the Dingwalls club in northern London and noted that their movement included fast, intricate footwork interspersed with glides, spins, drops, splits and nerve shakes. An important group emerging from this scene was The Brothers in Jazz, a trio from northern England consisting of Wayne James, Irven Lewis, and Trevor Miller.

Keywords:   Club jazz dance, Dingwalls club, Irven Lewis, Jazz music, London, Street jazz, The Brothers in Jazz, Vernacular dance

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