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Masculinity after TrujilloThe Politics of Gender in Dominican Literature$
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Maja Horn

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780813049304

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813049304.001.0001

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De-tropicalizing the Trujillo Dictatorship and Dominican Masculinity

De-tropicalizing the Trujillo Dictatorship and Dominican Masculinity

Chapter:
(p.23) 1 De-tropicalizing the Trujillo Dictatorship and Dominican Masculinity
Source:
Masculinity after Trujillo
Author(s):

Maja Horn

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813049304.003.0002

This chapter argues that today’s dominant notions of Dominican masculinity have relatively recent roots in the dictatorship of Rafael Leónidas Trujillo (1930–1961), whose discourse of hyper-masculinity in turn responded strongly to the notions of imperial and racialized masculinity that marked the U.S. presence in the country, especially during the U.S. military occupation from 1916 until 1924. This chapter thus rethinks prevalent understandings of Dominican masculinity as simply a continuation of a longstanding patriarchal “tradition” and highlights how it was decisively transformed by the Trujillo dictatorship, U.S. imperialism, and other transnational impulses.

Keywords:   Dominican Republic, Dictatorship, Trujillo, U.S. Imperialism, Masculinity, Gender

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