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From These Honored DeadHistorical Archaeology of the American Civil War$
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Clarence R. Geier, Douglas D. Scott, and Lawrence E. Babits

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780813049441

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813049441.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 16 October 2019

Home is Where the Woods Are

Home is Where the Woods Are

An Analysis of a Civil War Camp Complex in Virginia

Chapter:
(p.141) 9 Home is Where the Woods Are
Source:
From These Honored Dead
Author(s):

Matthew Reeves

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813049441.003.0010

Military camps represent staging areas for troops, the places where they rested from previous campaigns and lay in readiness for the next campaign to begin. This study offers a view into one of the largest intact set of Civil War camp complexes in Virginia. Over the past six years, the Montpelier Foundation Archaeology Department has conducted pedestrian and metal detector surveys of wooded areas on the 2,700 acres of the Montpelier property. During these surveys, archaeologists have identified and mapped close to 25 sites related to the Confederate Army's occupation of the property during the winter of 1863–1864. Identified sites include seven regimental camps; five company camps; cavalry camps that occupy former slave quarters; specialized activity areas related to the encampments; and non-military sites that likely featured prominently during the military occupation. This paper will discuss the methodology used in identifying these sites, the rationale for their remarkable preservation, and the analysis of site function and patterned military use of terrain.

Keywords:   Montpelier, metal detecting, Cavalry Camps, Virginia, winter of 1863–1864

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