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Creole RenegadesRhetoric of Betrayal and Guilt in the Caribbean Diaspora$
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Benedicte Boisseron

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780813049793

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813049793.001.0001

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V. S. Naipaul and Jamaica Kincaid

V. S. Naipaul and Jamaica Kincaid

Rhetoric of National Dis-Allegiance

Chapter:
(p.130) 4 V. S. Naipaul and Jamaica Kincaid
Source:
Creole Renegades
Author(s):

Bénédicte Boisseron

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813049793.003.0005

This chapter revisits the assumed duty of loyalty that befalls immigrants in regard to their native postcolonial nations. It primarely questions whether publicly criticizing home should necessarily be viewed as an act of treason in Caribbean diasporic writing. The chapter juxtaposes the Antiguan American Jamaica Kincaid and the Trinidadian English V. S. Naipaul in order to show, first, the similarities between the two provocative renegade writers and, second, the importance of the geographical context of production that eventually sets them apart. Kincaid proposes a vision of America as a site of creative freedom, where criticizing home is a personal affair and not necessarily a postcolonial, historicized endeavor. Naipaul, in contrast, offers a European perspective on the Caribbean.

Keywords:   Kincaid, Naipaul, Antigua, Trinidad, America, Europe, postcolonial, home, disallegiance

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