Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Tracing ChildhoodBioarchaeological Investigations of Early Lives in Antiquity$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jennifer L. Thompson, Marta P. Alfonso-Durruty, and John J. Crandall

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780813049830

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813049830.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 24 July 2021

Little Helping Hands

Little Helping Hands

Insights from Punta Teatinos, Chile

Chapter:
(p.183) 9 Little Helping Hands
Source:
Tracing Childhood
Author(s):

Marta P. Alfonso-Durruty

Jennifer L. Thompson

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813049830.003.0010

Subadults are commonly characterized as passive and costly dependents who receive energy and goods from the adults in their groups. Although helpless and dependent at birth, as individuals grow, they develop and acquire skills that transform them into active “working” agents. As these changes occur, their social roles are altered and they increasingly contribute to the pooled energy budget of the group. The timing of this transition is influenced by their physical and cultural environment. The biological and social transition that takes place from infancy into adulthood has received little attention in bioarchaeological studies. Using behavioral signatures on bones and teeth (including trauma and pathologies) we systematically assess the changes in subadult societal roles among those buried at the Archaic site of Punta Teatinos (4,905–4,000 BP). Our results show that prehistoric forager children (subadults) rapidly transition into an adult world, the roles and activities of which increased their risk, especially from the juvenile stage onward. These results add to our understanding of children's (subadult’s) changing roles in prehistory.

Keywords:   children, social role, Punta Teatinos, Archaic

Florida Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .