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Tracing ChildhoodBioarchaeological Investigations of Early Lives in Antiquity$
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Jennifer L. Thompson, Marta P. Alfonso-Durruty, and John J. Crandall

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780813049830

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813049830.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 24 July 2021

The Bioarchaeology of the Homicide of Infants and Children

The Bioarchaeology of the Homicide of Infants and Children

Chapter:
(p.99) 5 The Bioarchaeology of the Homicide of Infants and Children
Source:
Tracing Childhood
Author(s):

Simon Mays

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813049830.003.0006

This chapter discusses the skeletal evidence for infant and child homicide in the past. Discussion is organized under four headings: infanticide; infant and child sacrifice; homicide of children by violence or neglect; and infants and children as victims of warfare. Examples of diverse geographic and temporal origin are discussed. Homicide in many cases leaves no mark upon the skeleton, so studies often emphasise indirect methods such as the recognition of abnormal demographic profiles or non-normative burial treatments. It is argued that the liminal position of infants and children in many societies may be key to understanding homicide of non-adults in the past.

Keywords:   infanticide, warfare, infant, child, homicide, violence, liminal position

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