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Nation within a NationThe American South and the Federal Government$
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Glenn Feldman

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780813049878

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813049878.001.0001

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Dixiecrats, Dissenting Delegates, and the Dying Democratic Party

Dixiecrats, Dissenting Delegates, and the Dying Democratic Party

Mississippi's Right Turn from Roosevelt to Johnson

Chapter:
(p.122) 4 Dixiecrats, Dissenting Delegates, and the Dying Democratic Party
Source:
Nation within a Nation
Author(s):

Rebecca Miller Davis

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813049878.003.0005

Rebecca Miller Davis explores politics in Mississippi, one of the South's most notoriously segregationist states, between 1945 and 1964. She argues that Mississippi politics took a decided “right turn” after the war as the federal government showed itself determined to include black people in New Deal, Fair Deal, and successive government programs and activist initiatives in the Democratic administrations of Roosevelt, Truman, Kennedy, and Johnson (and, to a lesser degree, Republican Dwight Eisenhower). She covers Mississippi's considerable involvement in the 1948 Dixiecrat Revolt through Mississippi's famous “Freedom Summer” of 1964 and the appeal of Republican presidential candidate Barry Goldwater to white Mississippians upset by racial liberalism on the part of national Democrats. The chapter documents Goldwater's appeal to disenchanted white Mississippi Democrats because of his opposition of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, and the success of former-Democrats such as Prentiss Walker in Mississippi, who rode Goldwater's coat-tails to become the state's first Republican congressman since 1883.

Keywords:   Mississippi, New Deal, Civil Rights Act of 1964, “Freedom Summer”, Barry Goldwater

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