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Historical Archaeology of Early Modern Colonialism in Asia-PacificThe Asia-Pacific Region$
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Maria Cruz Berrocal and Cheng-hwa Tsang

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780813054766

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813054766.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 16 September 2021

Maritime Trade in the Philippines during the Early Colonial Period (Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries CE)

Maritime Trade in the Philippines during the Early Colonial Period (Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries CE)

Chapter:
(p.29) 2 Maritime Trade in the Philippines during the Early Colonial Period (Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries CE)
Source:
Historical Archaeology of Early Modern Colonialism in Asia-Pacific
Author(s):

Bobby C. Orillaneda

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813054766.003.0003

The arrival of the Spanish naval expedition in the Philippines in 1521 CE transformed the archipelago from a series of small and fragmented ports and polities engaged in Southeast Asian intra-regional trade into a locus of a maritime trade network on a global scale. Manila became an entrepôt in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries due to the Manila-Acapulco galleon trade, which ran for 250 years and linked the eastern and western worlds through the exchange of tangible trading commodities and technology as well as ideas, beliefs, and traditions. This chapter provides a brief historical background of the maritime trade in the Philippines, with special focus on the Manila galleon trade. It also provides a summary of the excavation results of Philippine underwater sites that have been dated to the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The shipwrecks include the Manila galleons San Diego, Nuestra Señora de la Vida, Encarnación, and San José as well as other shipwrecks: Española, Marinduque, Royal Captain Shoal, and San Isidro. These vessels carried both peoples of different nationalities and a wide range of trading and utilitarian goods, and they provided valuable information on the diversity and complexity of maritime trade in the Philippines at this time.

Keywords:   Philippines, Manila Galleons, Maritime Trade, Shipwrecks

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