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Reading the BonesActivity, Biology, and Culture$
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Elizabeth Weiss

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780813054988

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813054988.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 24 September 2021

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis

Chapter:
(p.69) 4 Osteoarthritis
Source:
Reading the Bones
Author(s):

Elizabeth Weiss

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813054988.003.0004

In this chapter, osteoarthritis etiology, which is often thought to be the result of wear and tear on joints, is examined using a multidisciplinary approach. Bioarchaeologists look for porosity, eburnation, and osteophytic lipping on joints to identify osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is ubiquitous in bioarchaeological skeletal remains, but it also occurs in 70 percent of people over 65 years old in living populations. Anthropologists use occupational research to surmise that osteoarthritis is caused by overuse of joints, but medical researchers have found that osteoarthritis of certain joints (e.g., knee) have high heritability rates. Plus, age is the best predictor for who has osteoarthritis. Yet osteoarthritis patterns between past populations and modern clinical samples differ; for example, earlier populations have an earlier onset than in modern populations.

Keywords:   eburnation, osteoarthritis, osteophytic lipping, porosity

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