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An Archaeology of Structural ViolenceLife in a Twentieth-Century Coal Town$
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Michael P. Roller

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780813056081

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813056081.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 03 August 2021

Migration, Part 2

Migration, Part 2

Emancipation and Catastrophe

Chapter:
(p.136) 6 Migration, Part 2
Source:
An Archaeology of Structural Violence
Author(s):

Michael P. Roller

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813056081.003.0007

Chapter 6 takes up the changing spatial landscape explored first in chapter 4 in a much-altered political and economic environment, the decline of the anthracite coal industry in mid-century. This is also a period of emancipation for the company town accompanied by the development of new forms of identification and immigration of a different sort than that covered in previous chapters. Attention to the material record suggests that this emancipation from industrial control signalled the development of new forms of collectively organized communal improvements through direct democracy. Landscape archaeology also suggests that the intersection of contemporary subjectivity and space such as aspects of privacy, ownership, and differentiation also begin to take hold in this period.

Keywords:   coal industry, company towns, landscape archaeology, immigration, direct democracy

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