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An Archaeology of AbundanceReevaluating the Marginality of California's Islands$
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Kristina M. Gill, Mikael Fauvelle, and Jon M. Erlandson

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780813056166

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813056166.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 25 January 2020

Paleocoastal Landscapes, Marginality, and Early Human Settlement of the California Islands

Paleocoastal Landscapes, Marginality, and Early Human Settlement of the California Islands

Chapter:
(p.59) 3 Paleocoastal Landscapes, Marginality, and Early Human Settlement of the California Islands
Source:
An Archaeology of Abundance
Author(s):

Amy E. Gusick

Jon M. Erlandson

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813056166.003.0003

If the California Islands were marginal for human settlement, why were several of them occupied more or less continuously since Terminal Pleistocene or Early Holocene times? The earliest human history of California's Islands is clouded by sea level rise, coastal erosion, dune building, and differential research intensity. Nonetheless, Paleocoastal sites are abundant on the Northern Channel Islands and Cedros Island, suggesting that they were optimal habitat for early hunter-gatherers, with ample food, freshwater, mineral, and other resources to sustain permanent settlement. Worldwide on islands where late Pleistocene or early Holocene human colonization occurred, climate shifts and massive landscape changes caused by postglacial sea level rise require detailed reconstructions of paleogeography and paleoecology to assess the potential productivity or marginality of islands or archipelagos.

Keywords:   Paleocoastal, Sea level rise, Paleoecology, Paleogeography

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