Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
An Archaeology of AbundanceReevaluating the Marginality of California's Islands$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Kristina M. Gill, Mikael Fauvelle, and Jon M. Erlandson

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780813056166

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813056166.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 25 January 2020

The Potential Use of Seaweeds and Marine Plants by Native Peoples of Alta and Baja California

The Potential Use of Seaweeds and Marine Plants by Native Peoples of Alta and Baja California

Implications for “Marginal” Island Ecosystems

Chapter:
(p.135) 5 The Potential Use of Seaweeds and Marine Plants by Native Peoples of Alta and Baja California
Source:
An Archaeology of Abundance
Author(s):

Amira F. Ainis

Jon M. Erlandson

Kristina M. Gill

Michael H. Graham

René L. Vellanoweth

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813056166.003.0005

Archaeologically, the use of marine kelps and seaweeds is poorly understood, yet California's islands are surrounded by extensive and highly productive kelp forests with nearshore habitats containing more than 100 edible species. Historical accounts from around the Pacific Rim demonstrate considerable use of seaweeds and seagrasses by native people, but there has been little discussion of seaweeds as a potential food source on California's islands. This chapter summarizes the biology, diversity, ecology, and productivity of marine macroalgae and marine angiosperms in the California Bight, supporting the likely consumption of seaweeds in the past. The potential use of plentiful and nutritious seaweeds by California Island peoples has major implications for the perceived marginality of the islands.

Keywords:   Macroalgae, Kelp, Seaweed, Marine angiosperms

Florida Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .