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The Archaeology of Removal in North America$
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Terrance Weik

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780813056395

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2020

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813056395.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 03 August 2021

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Value and Destruction in a Nineteenth-and Twentieth-Century Quarry Town

Chapter:
(p.103) 5 Worth(Less)
Source:
The Archaeology of Removal in North America
Author(s):

Adam Fracchia

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813056395.003.0005

The small industrial town of Texas, Maryland, employed hundreds of Irish immigrants in the quarrying and burning of limestone during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This chapter by Adam Fracchia examines patterns of value based on categories of class, ethnicity, and race that were influenced by and necessary to ensure the profitability of the quarry industry. Historical records in combination with material culture illustrate shifts in these values over time and the patterns of marginalization that led to the removal of Texans and the destruction of their property. Ultimately, the preservation of the town is governed by similar notions of value tied to the current mode of production and a static perception of the town’s heritage that indirectly supports its continued destruction.

Keywords:   quarry industry, material culture, Irish immigrants

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