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The Archaeology of Removal in North America$
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Terrance Weik

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780813056395

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2020

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813056395.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 24 July 2021

Creating a Community in Confinement

Creating a Community in Confinement

The Development of Neighborhoods in Amache, a World War II Japanese American Internment Camp

Chapter:
(p.157) 7 Creating a Community in Confinement
Source:
The Archaeology of Removal in North America
Author(s):

April Kamp-Whittaker

Bonnie J. Clark

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813056395.003.0007

In 1942 Japanese Americans from the west coast of the United States were forcibly relocated to incarceration camps scattered across the interior of the country. Relocation disrupted existing social networks, first through displacement and then through separation between the ten primary internment centers. Evidence revealed through archaeological study of one such site—Amache, Colorado—highlights the strategies of individuals living in these haphazard arrangements for creating more cohesive social groups and contributes to the disciplinary conversation about the critical role neighborhoods can play in community formation among the relocated.

Keywords:   neighborhood, incarceration camps, Amache Colorado, Japanese Americans, community formation, relocation

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