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Resistance ReimaginedBlack Women's Critical Thought as Survival$
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Regis M. Fox

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780813056586

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813056586.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 25 September 2021

Conclusion

Conclusion

Roll Call

Chapter:
(p.143) Conclusion
Source:
Resistance Reimagined
Author(s):

Regis M. Fox

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813056586.003.0006

The conclusion explores the kinship between Resistance Reimagined: Black Women’s Critical Thought as Survival and the #SayHerName Movement, as articulated by the African American Policy Forum. A more capacious roll call of instigators of black opposition encompasses sustained engagement with the philosophies and social achievements of intellectuals too frequently deemed incomprehensible as such. Accordingly, fully engaging with the liberal problematic entails grappling with fierce intricacies of black interiority and imagination, thereby upsetting time-honored biases regarding black resistance and power. Reading Harriet Wilson, Elizabeth Keckly, and Anna Julia Cooper’s literary endeavors differently likewise involves theorizing a counter-hegemony as concerned with vicious racial antagonism as subtle micro-aggression, with a theft of the black body as with a theft of black joy. In neglecting black knowledge production in its myriad forms, a history bereft of ambiguity and contradiction, and consequently, of humanity, emerges.

Keywords:   Harriet Wilson, Elizabeth Keckly, Elizabeth Keckley, Anna Julia Cooper, Say Her Name, African American Policy Forum, Liberal Problematic, Black Resistance, Interiority

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