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Children and Childhood in Bioarchaeology$
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Patrick Beauchesne and Sabrina C. Agarwal

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780813056807

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813056807.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 23 September 2021

Exploring Linear Enamel Hypoplasia as an Embodied Product of Childhood Stress in Late/Final Jomon Period Foragers Using Incremental Microstructures of Enamel

Exploring Linear Enamel Hypoplasia as an Embodied Product of Childhood Stress in Late/Final Jomon Period Foragers Using Incremental Microstructures of Enamel

Chapter:
(p.239) 7 Exploring Linear Enamel Hypoplasia as an Embodied Product of Childhood Stress in Late/Final Jomon Period Foragers Using Incremental Microstructures of Enamel
Source:
Children and Childhood in Bioarchaeology
Author(s):

Daniel H. Temple

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813056807.003.0008

Childhood is an ecologically and socially mediated component of life history. Among prehistoric foragers from the Late/Final Jomon period (3400 to 2300 BP), socially visible identities associated with childhood begin at approximately 2.0 years, while ecologically identifiable childhood begins at approximately 3.5 years. Incremental microstructures of enamel were evaluated for evidence of linear enamel hypoplasia (LEH), and age-at-defect formation was estimated in the dental remains of these individuals. Interquartile ranges for age-at-defect formation were between 2.8 and 4.1 years, while 90% confidence intervals were between 2.1 and 4.8 years. The number of LEH formed during these ages was, however, neutral with respect to mortality. These results argue that the transition from infancy to childhood was a period for increased growth disruption among these prehistoric foragers, although these disruptions did not influence mortality patterns. These findings suggest that the stress experienced during the infancy/childhood transition was incorporated into the Jomon physiological system in such a way that it did not diminish energetic investments into surviving future stress events.

Keywords:   Jomon, Childhood, Linear Enamel Hypoplasia, Stress, Mortality patterns

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