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Children and Childhood in Bioarchaeology$
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Patrick Beauchesne and Sabrina C. Agarwal

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780813056807

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813056807.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 23 September 2021

Children of the Revolution

Children of the Revolution

Childhood Health Inequalities and the Life Course during Industrialization of the 18th and 19th Centuries in England

Chapter:
(p.294) 9 Children of the Revolution
Source:
Children and Childhood in Bioarchaeology
Author(s):

Rebecca Gowland

Sophie L. Newman

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813056807.003.0010

The Industrial Revolution in England during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries resulted in rapid urbanisation and profound socio-economic change. Health inequalities between both rich and poor as well as urban and rural dwellers during this period intensified, as evidenced by contemporary descriptions of the wretched physical appearance of the urban working classes. Recent excavations of skeletal assemblages from this period provide a unique opportunity to explore the direct physiological impact of industrialisation. Childhood growth and morbidity is multidimensional in aetiology, but results demonstrate that metabolic diseases were rife and that skeletal growth and development were adversely affected. In this chapter, the effects of the developmental plasticity and the inter-generational origins of growth deficits are also considered. These findings have been integrated with contemporaneous historical accounts in order to provide a more nuanced interpretation of childhood life and death during this period.

Keywords:   England, Industrial Revolution, Childhood Growth, Metabolic Disease, Developmental Plasticity

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