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Immigration and National Identities in Latin America$
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Nicola Foote and Michael Goebel

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780813060002

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813060002.001.0001

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British Caribbean Migration and the Racialization of Latin American Nationalisms

British Caribbean Migration and the Racialization of Latin American Nationalisms

Chapter:
(p.205) 8 British Caribbean Migration and the Racialization of Latin American Nationalisms
Source:
Immigration and National Identities in Latin America
Author(s):

Nicola Foote

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813060002.003.0009

This chapter explores the relationship between immigration and national identity in Latin America by analyzing the experiences of black migrants from the British Caribbean. The chapter outlines the critical contribution made by West Indians to modernization projects and economic development across Latin America, especially their role in the integration of geographically marginal areas. It documents the abuses migrants suffered at the hands of American corporate officials and national authorities, and contextualizes this abuse in Latin American racial discourses that characterized blacks as violent, unhygienic and sexually promiscuous. It also examines the diaspora nationalisms of Caribbean migrants and assesses how their strong identification with the British Empire both responded to and shaped their exclusion from Latin American citizenship. The chapter draws on the often-neglected case-studies of Peru, Ecuador, Brazil and Venezuela as well as the more familiar migratory examples of Central America and Cuba, and brings nineteenth century British migratory currents into dialogue with those of the twentieth century.

Keywords:   British Caribbean, Migrants, Migration, National Identity, Nationalism, racial discourse

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