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Black LegaciesRace and the European Middle Ages$
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Lynn T. Ramey

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780813060071

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813060071.001.0001

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Medieval Miscegenation and the Literary Imagination

Medieval Miscegenation and the Literary Imagination

Chapter:
(p.64) 4 Medieval Miscegenation and the Literary Imagination
Source:
Black Legacies
Author(s):

Lynn T. Ramey

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813060071.003.0005

This chapter probes into medieval notions of inheritance, reproduction, and miscegenation. Early treatises on conception and genetics reveal that medieval people did not see race as unchanging or as something that could be passed along from parent to child. The chapter also examines the cultural context of medieval Christianity. It argues that some questions will likely never be answered because of a lack of data on medieval practices and thought. The chapter also discusses medieval philosophies on difference that was prevalent enough to have distinctly been passed on to later generations. It investigates religious conversion that could, it was thought, change physical forms to the point where bodies were destabilized and even in danger of flipping back to other races.

Keywords:   inheritance, reproduction, race, parent, child, medieval practices, religious conversion

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