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Building the PastPrehistoric Wooden Post Architecture in the Ohio Valley-Great Lakes$
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Brian G. Redmond and Robert A. Genheimer

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780813060408

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813060408.001.0001

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Changes in Precontact Domestic Architecture at the Heckelman Site in Northern Ohio

Changes in Precontact Domestic Architecture at the Heckelman Site in Northern Ohio

Chapter:
(p.188) 8 Changes in Precontact Domestic Architecture at the Heckelman Site in Northern Ohio
Source:
Building the Past
Author(s):

Brian G. Redmond

Brian L. Scanlan

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813060408.003.0008

Recent investigations at the Heckelman site in Erie County, Ohio, document three distinct forms of wooden-post architecture. The oldest structure is sub-rectangular with a floor area of 70 m2. Associated pits contained ceramics vessels and carbon samples dating from the mid-sixth to mid-eighth centuries A.D. Also uncovered was a semi-subterranean, keyhole structure, dating to the mid-sixteenth century A.D. This possible winter dwelling had a minimum floor area of 4.5 m2, a sloping entryway, and contained carbonized thatch and a small interior hearth. Finally, a rectangular structure constructed from small-diameter stakes was documented. It dates to the mid-fifteenth century A.D. and resembles communal dwellings known for late prehistoric and early historic villages in the Great Lakes and Northeast. These three structures reflect significant changes in architectural form, which in turn illustrate the evolution of village sedentism and shifting seasonality over the final thousand years of northern Ohio prehistory.

Keywords:   Heckelman site, Wooden-post architecture, Keyhole structure, Communal dwelling, Late Prehistoric, Early Historic, Village sedentism

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