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Origins of the DreamHughes's Poetry and King's Rhetoric$
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W. Jason Miller

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780813060446

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813060446.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 27 July 2021

“Youth”

“Youth”

Hughes’s Poem and King’s Chiasmus

Chapter:
(p.122) 6 “Youth”
Source:
Origins of the Dream
Author(s):

W. Jason Miller

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813060446.003.0006

This chapter reconstructs a trip taken by King and Hughes to Nigeria in November of 1960 to celebrate the inauguration of Nnamdi Azikiwe. With each man looking on, Azikiwe ended his inauguration speech by quoting the poem “Youth” by Langston Hughes. This chapter exhaustively documents how King himself had been rewriting ideas from this poem and using it throughout his sermons, speeches, personal letters, and even church reports on no less than seventy different occasions. By combining Hughes’s ideas with the words from another poem by Robert Burns, King constructed a memorable and poetic line organized around the principles of parallelism and chiasmus thus allowing the ideas of a black American and white Scotsman to model the idea of integration. As a result of this trip, Hughes dedicated his cantata “Ballad of the Brown King” to Martin Luther King.

Keywords:   “Ballad of the Brown King”, chiasmus, Nigeria, Nnamdi Azikiwe, Robert Burns, “Youth”

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