Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Origins of the DreamHughes's Poetry and King's Rhetoric$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

W. Jason Miller

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780813060446

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813060446.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 29 July 2021

“The Psalm of Brotherhood”

“The Psalm of Brotherhood”

King at Detroit’s March for Jobs

Chapter:
(p.176) 9 “The Psalm of Brotherhood”
Source:
Origins of the Dream
Author(s):

W. Jason Miller

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813060446.003.0009

This chapter offers a detailed reading of the dream King presented in Detroit on June 23, 1963, to demonstrate that King’s dream that day was literally presented in the form of a poem. This “Psalm of Brotherhood” uses elements of chiasmus, parallelism, alliteration, and off rhyme to communicate as true poetry. Immediately after King ended this “Psalm,” he coalesces ideas about dreams by alluding to the biblical book of Daniel and the secular poetry of Langston Hughes. The speech as a whole is contextualized by recounting conditions in Detroit, examining the influence of William Ruether, and analyzing remarks made by John F. Kennedy that King himself alludes to in his speech.

Keywords:   alliteration, chiasmus, Book of Daniel, John F. Kennedy, off rhyme, parallelism, “Psalm of Brotherhood”, William Ruether

Florida Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .