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Rethinking ColonialismComparative Archaeological Approaches$
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Craig N. Cipolla and Katherine Howlett Hayes

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780813060705

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813060705.001.0001

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Rethinking Colonialism

Rethinking Colonialism

Indigenous Innovation and Colonial Inevitability

Chapter:
(p.121) 7 Rethinking Colonialism
Source:
Rethinking Colonialism
Author(s):

Stephen A. Mrozowski

D. Rae Gould

Heather Law Pezzarossi

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813060705.003.0007

This chapter argues for a rethinking of colonialism as an historical process. Three Native American archaeological sites researched by the authors suggest that the Nipmuc people of modern-day Massachusetts and Connecticut continued to shape their own cultural and political destiny despite European colonization. An historical narrative of indigenous innovation and cultural perseverance—that runs counter to the inevitability inherent in the political discourse of the past two hundred years—is presented through understanding the generational choices involving older practices and new practices. This narrative attempts to move beyond the notion of indigenous resistance to a new understanding of the role innovation played and continues to play in the production of contemporary indigenous society, particularly in New England.

Keywords:   Native American, Indigenous, New England, colonialism, innovation, Nipmuc

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