Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Migration and DisruptionsToward a Unifying Theory of Ancient and Contemporary Migrations$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Brenda J. Baker and Takeyuki Tsuda

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780813060804

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813060804.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 22 September 2021

Introduction

Introduction

Bridging the Past and Present in Assessing Migration

Chapter:
(p.3) Introduction
Source:
Migration and Disruptions
Author(s):

Brenda J. Baker

Takeyuki Tsuda

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813060804.003.0014

The introduction discusses the lack of interdisciplinary collaboration and dialogue between scholars studying contemporary and ancient migration because of the assumption that current population movements differ radically from those in the distant past. The authors argue that there are substantial continuities between present and past migration and that scholars studying ancient and modern migration can benefit considerably by sharing their knowledge and learning from each other. The research project that culminated in this edited volume is described, and the focus on the role that natural and social disruptions played as a force in population movement through time is explained. The volume organization is delineated, with chapter summaries highlighting common threads among the case studies presented.

Keywords:   Migration, Natural disruptions, Social disruptions, Contemporary migration, Ancient migration

Florida Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .