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Migration and DisruptionsToward a Unifying Theory of Ancient and Contemporary Migrations$
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Brenda J. Baker and Takeyuki Tsuda

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780813060804

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813060804.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 23 September 2019

Environmental Disruption as a Consequence of Human Migration

Environmental Disruption as a Consequence of Human Migration

The Case of the U.S.-Mexico Border

Chapter:
(p.179) 8 Environmental Disruption as a Consequence of Human Migration
Source:
Migration and Disruptions
Author(s):

Lisa Meierotto

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813060804.003.0008

Human migration has been a factor in environmental disruption along the United States–Mexico border both historically and in modern times. This chapter examines the impact of human migration as well as the impact of modern-day border security forces in Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge is a federally protected wilderness area in southern Arizona on the U.S.-Mexico border. The root causes of environmental disruption in the region are often blamed on modern undocumented immigrants. However, U.S. border security forces also create significant environmental disruption and degradation. Through an examination of the environmental history of human migration in the region, we see that people have long used this region as a travel corridor. A longer-term historical analysis offers a more comprehensive understanding of human migration and environmental disruption along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Keywords:   Human migration, Environmental disruption, U.S.-Mexico border, Environmental history, Wilderness, Border security

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