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Migration and DisruptionsToward a Unifying Theory of Ancient and Contemporary Migrations$
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Brenda J. Baker and Takeyuki Tsuda

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780813060804

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813060804.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 23 September 2021

Rethinking “Causation” and “Disruption”

Rethinking “Causation” and “Disruption”

The Environment-Migration Nexus in Northern Ethiopia

Chapter:
(p.196) 9 Rethinking “Causation” and “Disruption”
Source:
Migration and Disruptions
Author(s):

James Morrissey

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813060804.003.0009

This chapter explores the usefulness of linking disruption and causation in analyses of mobility. To do so it examines the literature that has recently sprung up around comprehending the linkages between climate change and human migration (the “environment-migration nexus”), noting that such literature initially posited environmental change as a disruption, and thus cause of migration. The chapter provides a case study from the northern highlands of Ethiopia to make the case that as much as environmental change matters in mobility decisions, so does the context in which such change occurs. The chapter therefore calls into question the notion of “disruption as a cause and consequence of migration,” arguing that simple, linear conceptions of causation might be inappropriate and that they might bias research findings. To address these issues the chapter provides a conceptual framework which is aimed at ensuring that the disruptive causes of mobility are understood in their appropriate contexts.

Keywords:   Migration, Climate change, Conceptual framework, Ethiopia, Environmental migration

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