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Race, Ideology, and the Decline of Caribbean Marxism$
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Anthony P. Maingot

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780813061061

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813061061.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 28 July 2021

Haitian Realities and Scholarly Myths

Haitian Realities and Scholarly Myths

A Counterintuitive Analysis

Chapter:
(p.98) 5 Haitian Realities and Scholarly Myths
Source:
Race, Ideology, and the Decline of Caribbean Marxism
Author(s):

Anthony P. Maingot

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813061061.003.0005

It is perhaps predictable that, given Haiti’s isolation among world nations, foreign interventions should be blamed for virtually all of the island’s problems. Specific analysis of critical Haitian regimes (those of Leslie Manigat and Jean-Bertrand Aristide, for example) shows that even when confronted with benign foreign actions, Haitians have not been able to govern themselves democratically and peacefully. The nearly two decades’ presence of the United Nations peace-keeping force (MINUSTAH) is evidence that outside forces are necessary to maintain order. Beyond human driven crises, Haiti has been repeatedly visited by tragic national disasters such as hurricanes and earthquakes. Though Haitians resist the identification, the island is as case of “international concern” as Leslie Manigat once put it.

Keywords:   Haiti, isolation, regimes, Leslie Manigat, Jean-Bertrand Aristide, foreign intervention, natural disasters, international concern, United Nations, peace-keeping force

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