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Rescuing Our RootsThe African Anglo-Caribbean Diaspora in Contemporary Cuba$
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Andrea J. Queeley

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780813061092

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813061092.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 25 July 2021

“Somos Negros Finos” (We Are Refined Blacks)

“Somos Negros Finos” (We Are Refined Blacks)

Rescuing Roots as an Assertion of Respectable Blackness

Chapter:
(p.143) 4 “Somos Negros Finos” (We Are Refined Blacks)
Source:
Rescuing Our Roots
Author(s):

Andrea J. Queeley

, John M. Kirk
Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813061092.003.0005

In chapter 4, Queeley proposes that the construction and maintenance of a respectable Blackness, rooted in civilizational discourse, is an alternative to ideologies of race mixture and whitening. Its persistence in the contemporary period points to the local impact of globalized inequalities, as well as to the ways in which revolutionary society fell short of its objective to eliminate racism. The respectable Blackness construct also illustrates the asymmetries that characterize assertions of diasporic subjectivity. Narratives of Anglo-Caribbean Cuban cultural citizenship and experiences of racism open a window onto how and under what conditions these asymmetries are reproduced. Chapter 4 analyzes these narratives and, incorporating reflexive ethnography, concludes by envisioning more productive ways of affirming Blackness that do not fall prey to racial and cultural discourses of mixture, hybridity, or essentialism.

Keywords:   respectable Blackness, race mixture, hybridity, diasporic subjectivity, cultural citizenship, racism, narratives, reflexive ethnography

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