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Up to Maughty LondonJoyce's Cultural Capital in the Imperial Metropolis$
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Eleni Loukopoulou

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780813062242

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813062242.001.0001

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Joyce and the British Avant-Garde

Joyce and the British Avant-Garde

Chapter:
(p.183) 5 Joyce and the British Avant-Garde
Source:
Up to Maughty London
Author(s):

Eleni Loukopoulou

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813062242.003.0006

“James Joyce and the British Avant-Garde” focuses on Joyce’s interaction with Cambridge’s intellectual milieu, where new experiments in literature were forcefully debated in the magazine Experiment (1928–31), founded and run by William Empson and Jacob Bronowski. I will outline the publication background and analyse the “Museyroom” extract from Work in Progress which was published in Experiment in 1931. The significance that Joyce attributed to this publication can be gauged by his strong interest in “helping” (Letters I 302) Stuart Gilbert to write an exegetical essay, titled “A Footnote to Work in Progress”, to be published alongside the extract from Work In Progress. The publications in Experiment have been neglected by Joyce scholarship thus far. Nonetheless, such publications are significant because they foreground the intense interest of the emerging British avant-garde in Joyce’s cultural practices and theoretical concerns. Equally overlooked is the publication of a section from “Proteus” in The European Caravan anthology (1931). This was the first Anglo-phone anthology to present post-WWI experimental literature from France, Italy, Great Britain, and Ireland. Bronowski sub-edited the section on Britain and Ireland with the help of Thomas McGreevy and Samuel Beckett.

Keywords:   Experiment, William Empson, Jacob Bronowski, Museyroom, Work in Progress, The European Caravan, James Joyce, Stuart Gilbert, Proteus, Thomas McGreevy

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